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Special Feature
February 2000

Picture of the Month

Author Affiliations

From the Division of General Pediatrics, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Ariz.

 

WALTER W.TUNNESSENMD

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2000;154(2):201. doi:10.1001/archpedi.154.2.201

TWO CHILDREN presented with skin lesions of different appearance but similar cause. Neither child had a history of lesions of this nature and neither had systemic symptoms. A 5-year-old girl was referred for evaluation of erythematous, vesicular, pruritic, and bullous skin lesions on her face, upper chest, abdomen, and extremities, which developed over 24 hours. The fluid in the bullae was clear. The skin covered by the top of her 2-piece bathing suit was spared. Two siblings had similar skin lesions that had developed during the same time span (Figure 1 and Figure 2). A 3-year-old boy presented with asymptomatic, macular, brownish skin lesions, predominantly on his arms, first noted on the day of referral (Figure 3 and Figure 4).

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