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Special Feature
November 2000

Picture of the Month

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Ill.

 

WALTER W.TUNNESSENMD

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2000;154(11):1161. doi:10.1001/archpedi.154.11.1161

TABLETS WERE NOTED in the vomitus of a 20-month-old girl. Unwitnessed, she had ingested a quantity of her grandmother's medication from a prescription container labeled "Procardia XL, 30 mg" (Pfizer Inc, New York, NY). Examination of the vomitus revealed 9 tablets and some activated charcoal (Figure 1). Concern arose because the tablets did not match the appearance of Procardia XL tablets (Figure 2). A Procardia XL tablet was obtained from an inpatient pharmacy and rinsed under water (Figure 3). Figure 4 is a schematic drawing of the nifedipine Gastrointestinal Therapeutic System (GITS).

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