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October 2016 - January 1911

Decade

Year

Issue

September 1, 2010, Vol 164, No. 9, Pages 791-888

Editorial

Marketing, Leadership, and the Health of Children

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):878-879. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.152

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in AdolescenceWhere to From Here?

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):880-881. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.149
About the Cover

Hemlock varnish shelf mushrooms. Somers, New York, November 2009

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):791-791. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.148
This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):793-793. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.162
Article

Trends in Exposure to Television Food Advertisements Among Children and Adolescents in the United States

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):794-802. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.139
ObjectiveTo examine the trends in food advertising seen by American children and adolescents.DesignTrend analysis of children's and adolescents' exposure to food advertising in 2003, 2005, and 2007, including separate analyses by race.ParticipantsChildren aged 2 to 5 years and 6 to 11 years and adolescents aged 12 to 17 years.Main ExposureTelevision ratings.Main Outcome MeasuresExposure to total food advertising and advertising by food category.ResultsBetween 2003 and 2007 daily average exposure to food ads fell by 13.7% and 3.7% among young children aged 2 to 5 and 6 to 11 years, respectively, but increased by 3.7% among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years. Exposure to sweets ads fell 41%, 29.3%, and 12.1%, respectively, for 2- to 5-, 6- to 11-, and 12- to 17-year-olds and beverage ads were down by about 27% to 30% across these age groups, with substantial decreases in exposure to ads for the most heavily advertised sugar-sweetened beverages—fruit drinks and regular soft drinks. Exposure to fast food ads increased by 4.7%, 12.2%, and 20.4% among children aged 2 to 5, 6 to 11, and 12 to 17 years, respectively, between 2003 and 2007. The racial gap in exposure to food advertising grew between 2003 and 2007, particularly for fast food ads.ConclusionsA number of positive changes have occurred in children's exposure to food advertising. Continued monitoring of food advertising exposure along with nutritional analyses is needed to further assess self-regulatory pledges.

Postinfectious Fatigue in Adolescents and Physical Activity

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):803-809. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.144

Adolescent Chronic Fatigue SyndromeA Follow-up Study

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):810-814. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.145

Biochemical and Vascular Aspects of Pediatric Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):817-823. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.157

Cerebrospinal Fluid Enterovirus Testing in Infants 56 Days or Younger

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):824-830. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.153

Parental Hopeful Patterns of Thinking, Emotions, and Pediatric Palliative Care Decision MakingA Prospective Cohort Study

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):831-839. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.146

Shortened Nighttime Sleep Duration in Early Life and Subsequent Childhood Obesity

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):840-845. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.143

Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Serum Endothelial Marker Levels in Obese Children With Metabolic Syndrome

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):846-851. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.160

Impaired Cardiac Function Among Obese AdolescentsEffect of Aerobic Interval Training

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):852-859. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.158

Perfluorooctanoic Acid, Perfluorooctanesulfonate, and Serum Lipids in Children and AdolescentsResults From the C8 Health Project

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):860-869. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.163

Changes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing Rates Among Urban Adolescents After Introduction of Routine and Rapid Testing

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):870-874. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.161
Special Feature

Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):875-875. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.150-a

Picture of the Month—Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):876-876. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.150-b
The Pediatric Forum

Trial Effect in Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):882-883. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.141

Trial Effect in Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia—Reply

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):882-883. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.142

When Is a Review Article Not a Review Article?

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):883-884. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.154

When Is a Review Article Not a Review Article?—Reply

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):883-884. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.155
Advice for Patients

Exercise

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(9):888-888. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.164
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