[Skip to Content]
Sign In
Individual Sign In
Create an Account
Institutional Sign In
OpenAthens Shibboleth
[Skip to Content Landing]

November 2016 - January 1911

Decade

Year

Issue

March 7, 2011, Vol 165, No. 3, Pages 191-284

On My Mind

The Suddenly Not-So-Well Well-Child Check: Staying Still to Listen Amidst the Chaos

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):197-197. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.290
Editorial

Continuing Medical Education and Lifelong Learning in the Archives

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):277-277. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.14

New Evidence on Program Impact Can Guide Implementation of Federal Home Visiting Program

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):278-279. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.220

Astoria RevisitedNew Hope in the Struggle to Link Community- and School-Based Care?

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):279-281. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.289
About the Cover

Frederick G. Banting and Charles H. Best, University of Toronto, 1921, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):191-191. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.3
This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):194-194. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.8
Commentary

Ideas, Ideals, and Innovation in the History of Diabetes

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):195-196. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.7
Article

Variation in Pregnancy Outcomes Following Statewide Implementation of a Prenatal Home Visitation Program

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):198-204. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.221
ObjectiveTo examine, following statewide dissemination, the influence of an evidence-based home visitation program for first-time mothers on reductions of subsequent pregnancies across time and different locations.DesignRetrospective cohort study.SettingReplication sites for the Nurse-Family Partnership (17 urban sites and 6 rural sites) across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2007.ParticipantsA total of 3844 Nurse-Family Partnership clients matched by propensity score to 10 938 local-area controls.Main ExposureProgram enrollment.Main Outcome MeasureTime to second pregnancy resulting in a live birth within 2 years of the first infant's birth.ResultsThere were no program effects on time to first pregnancy in the early years of the program (2000-2003), but clients whose first infants were born after 2003 had fewer second pregnancies compared with controls (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.96). This benefit occurred principally among mothers who were aged 18 years or younger (hazard ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.89) and was twice as strong among mothers aged 18 years or younger from rural locations (hazard ratio = 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.22-0.73) compared with those from urban locations (hazard ratio = 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.95).ConclusionsProgram effects on pregnancy planning emerged after an implementation period of 3 years in both urban and rural locations, but they were particularly strong in rural locations and among younger mothers.

The Anatomy of a US Preventive Services Task Force RecommendationLipid Screening for Children and Adolescents

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):205-210. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.299

The Window of Opportunity for Treatment Withdrawal

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):211-215. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.4

Neurodevelopmental and Perinatal Correlates of Simple Brain Metrics in Very Preterm Infants

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):216-222. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.9

Wide Availability of High-Calorie Beverages in US Elementary Schools

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):223-228. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.215
ObjectiveTo examine the availability of beverages for sale in elementary schools.DesignNationally representative mail-back survey.SettingUS public and private elementary schools during the 2006-2007, 2007-2008, and 2008-2009 school years.ParticipantsSurvey respondents at elementary schools.Main Outcome MeasureAvailability of beverages offered in competitive venues and school lunches.ResultsPublic elementary school students' access to beverages for sale in any competitive venue on campus (vending machines, stores, snack bars, and/or à la carte) increased from 49.0% in 2006-2007 to 61.3% in 2008- 2009 (P < .01). The percentage of public school students with access to only beverages allowed by the Institute of Medicine guidelines for competitive beverages (ie, water, 100% juice, and 1% or nonfat milk) increased from 10.0% to 16.1% (P < .01). Access to higher-fat milk (2% or whole milk) in school lunches decreased from 77.9% of public school students in 2006-2007 to 68.3% in 2008-2009 (P < .001). Flavored milk was available at lunch on most days for 92.1% of public school students.ConclusionsAs of the 2008-2009 school year, high-calorie beverages and beverages not allowed by national guidelines were still widely available in elementary schools.

Influence of Licensed Spokescharacters and Health Cues on Children's Ratings of Cereal Taste

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):229-234. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.300

Attachment Security and Obesity in US Preschool-Aged Children

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):235-242. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.292

Predictive Relationship Between Adolescent Oral and Vaginal SexResults From a Prospective, Longitudinal Study

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):243-249. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.214
ObjectivesTo (1) identify the temporal order between oral and vaginal sex onset; (2) test whether oral sex or vaginal sex is a risk or protective factor for the other; and (3) determine whether the relationship between oral and vaginal sex varies across time.DesignProspective, longitudinal study with 6-month assessments conducted between 2002 and 2005.SettingSelf-administered surveys completed during class time.ParticipantsAt baseline, 627 ninth grade high school students from 2 northern California schools were included in the study.Main Outcome MeasureOral and vaginal sex onset.ResultsAmong sexually active adolescents, most initiated vaginal sex after or within the same 6-month period of oral sex initiation. Adolescents who initiated oral sex at the end of ninth grade had a 50% chance of initiating vaginal sex by the end of 11th grade. In comparison, adolescents who delayed until the end of 11th grade had a 16% chance of initiating vaginal sex by the end of 11th grade.ConclusionsThe first 2 years of high school may be a critical age period for adolescents' vulnerability to vaginal sex initiation via oral sex behaviors. Comprehensive evidenced-based interventions and provision of preventive services aimed toward reducing sexual risk should be expanded to include the role oral sex plays in adolescent sex behavior.

Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use in a Nationally Representative Sample of AdolescentsEvidence of Greater Use Among Rural Adolescents

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):250-255. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.217
ObjectivesTo compare the prevalence of nonmedical prescription drug use among adolescents residing in urban, suburban, and rural areas of the United States and to determine factors independently associated with rural nonmedical prescription drug use among adolescents aged 12 to 17 years.DesignCross-sectional, population-based survey.SettingNoninstitutionalized residents in the United States.ParticipantsParticipants included adolescents aged 12 to 17 years (N = 17 872), most of whom were residing in urban areas (53.2%), male (51%), and white (59%).Main ExposureLiving in rural compared with urban area.Main Outcome MeasuresNonmedical use of prescription drugs (pain relievers, tranquilizers, sedatives, and stimulants). Data were from the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.ResultsRural adolescents were 26% more likely than urban adolescents to have used prescription drugs nonmedically (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.57) even after adjustment for race, health, and other drug and alcohol use. When examining the rural adolescents in particular, factors positively associated with nonmedical use of prescription drugs included decreased health status, major depressive episode(s), and other drug (marijuana, cocaine, hallucinogens, and inhalants) and alcohol use. Protective factors for nonmedical prescription drug use among rural adolescents included school enrollment and living in a 2-parent household.ConclusionsRural adolescents were significantly more likely than urban adolescents to report nonmedical prescription drug use. However, these results suggest there are multiple potential points of intervention to prevent initiation or progression of use among rural adolescents including preventing school dropout, increased parental involvement, and increased access to health, mental health, and substance abuse treatment.

Young Adult Outcomes of Children Growing Up With Chronic IllnessAn Analysis of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):256-261. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.287

Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Care for Urban Children With AsthmaResults of the School-Based Asthma Therapy Trial

Abstract Full Text
free access has expired quiz
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):262-268. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1

Individual and Family Motivational Interventions for Alcohol-Positive Adolescents Treated in an Emergency DepartmentResults of a Randomized Clinical Trial

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):269-274. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.296
Special Feature

Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):275-276. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.2-a

Picture of the Month—Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):275-276. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.2-b
Advice for Patients

Preventing and Treating Adolescent Alcohol Use

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):284-284. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.11
×