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May 2017 - January 1911

Decade

Year

Issue

April 4, 2011, Vol 165, No. 4, Pages 287-376

Editorial

Youth Sports ProgramsContribution to Physical Activity

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):369-370. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.245

Online FirstPublishing Results Quickly

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):369. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.22

Could Secondhand Smoke Exposure Harm the Mental Health of Children?

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):370-372. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.21
Announcement

2011 Certifying Examinations of the American Board of Pediatrics

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):293. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.20
About the Cover

Children of Oklahoma drought refugees on highway near Bakersfield, California

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):287. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.24
This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):290. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.26
Commentary

Skeleton of a CenturyAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children and Rickets in the 1930s

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):291-293. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.25
Article

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Physical Activity During Youth Sports Practices

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):294-299. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.252
ObjectiveTo document physical activity (PA) during organized youth soccer and baseball/softball practices.DesignCross-sectional study.SettingCommunity sports leagues in San Diego County, California.ParticipantsTwo hundred youth aged 7 to 14 years were recruited from 29 teams in 2 youth sports in middle-income cities with an approximately equal distribution across sports, sex, and age groups.Main ExposureYouth sports practices.Outcome MeasuresA sample of players wore accelerometers during practices. Minutes of PA at multiple intensity levels were calculated using established cutoff points. Participants were categorized as meeting or not meeting guidelines of at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) during practice.ResultsThe overall mean for MVPA was 45.1 minutes and 46.1% of practice time. Participants on soccer teams (+13.7 minutes, +10.6% of practice time), boys (+10.7 minutes, +7.8% of practice time), and those aged 7 to 10 years (+7.0 minutes, +5.8% of practice time) had significantly more MVPA than their counterparts. Participants on soccer teams spent an average of 17.0 more minutes and 15.9% more of practice time in vigorous-intensity PA than those on baseball/softball teams. Overall, 24% of participants met the 60-minute PA guideline during practice, but fewer than 10% of 11-to 14-year-olds and 2% of girl softball players met the guideline.ConclusionsParticipation in organized sports does not ensure that youth meet PA recommendations on practice days. The health effects of youth sports could be improved by adopting policies that ensure participants obtain PA during practices.

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Active Commuting to School and Cognitive Performance in AdolescentsThe AVENA Study

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):300-305. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.244
ObjectiveTo examine the associations between active commuting to school and cognitive performance in adolescents.DesignCross-sectional study.SettingFive cities (Granada, Madrid, Murcia, Santander, and Zaragoza) in Spain.ParticipantsA total of 1700 adolescents (892 girls) aged 13 to 18.5 years.Main ExposuresMode and duration of transportation to school and participation in extracurricular physical activity were self-reported.Main Outcome MeasuresCognitive performance (verbal, numeric, and reasoning abilities and an overall score) was measured by the Spanish version of the SRA Test of Educational Ability.ResultsActive commuting to school was associated with better cognitive performance (all P < .05) in girls but not in boys, independent of potential confounders including participation in extracurricular physical activity. In addition, adolescent girls who spent more than 15 minutes actively commuting to school had better scores in 3 of the 4 cognitive performance variables (all P < .05) than those who spent less time actively commuting to school (≤15 minutes) as well as better scores in all of the cognitive performance variables (all P < .001) than girls inactively commuting.ConclusionActive commuting to school and its duration may positively influence cognitive performance in adolescent girls.

Journal Club

Couple-Focused Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention for Young Latino ParentsRandomized Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Sustainability

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):306-312. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.28

Understanding Control in Adolescent and Young Adult Relationships

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):313-319. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.32

Decision-Making Style and Gender Moderation of the Self-efficacy–Condom Use Link Among Adolescents and Young AdultsInforming Targeted STI/HIV Prevention Programs

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):320-325. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.17

ONLINE FIRST

Objectively Measured Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Mental Health in ChildrenEvidence From the Scottish Health Survey

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):326-331. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.243
ObjectiveTo examine the association between objectively assessed secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and mental health in a representative sample of British children.DesignCross-sectional study.SettingCommunity-based population sample from the 2003 Scottish Health Survey.ParticipantsNine hundred one nonsmoking children (mean [SD] age, 8.3 [2.5] years).Main ExposureExposure to SHS was determined from salivary cotinine level and self-report.Main Outcome MeasurePsychological distress assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ).ResultsForty percent of the sample demonstrated high SHS exposure (cotinine level >0.70 ng/mL). Children with higher cotinine levels were more likely to live in areas of greater socioeconomic deprivation. Participants in the highest cotinine quartile (>0.70 ng/mL) had significantly higher total SDQ scores compared with those in the lowest quartile (age- and sex-adjusted mean difference = 2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 3.9). There was evidence of a dose-response effect across the cotinine group (P trend = .001). Of the SDQ subscales, the strongest associations with cotinine levels emerged for hyperactivity and conduct disorder. These associations remained statistically significant after adjustment for possible confounders including social deprivation, single-parent status, body mass index, chronic illness, and physical activity.ConclusionObjectively assessed SHS exposure was associated with poorer mental health among children.

Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Mental Health Among Children and Adolescents

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):332-338. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.30

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Home Injury Hazard ReductionThe HOME Injury Study

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):339-345. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.29

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National School Lunch Program Participation and Sex Differences in Body Mass Index Trajectories of Children From Low-Income Families

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):346-353. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.253
ObjectivesTo investigate participation patterns in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) among low-income children from kindergarten to fifth grade and to examine the ways in which participation influences sex differences in the trajectories of body mass index (BMI) through the eighth grade.DesignLongitudinal, secondary data analysis.SettingSample of low-income US children who entered kindergarten in 1998.ParticipantsGirls (n = 574) and boys (n = 566) from low-income families who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort.Main ExposureParticipation in the NSLP.Main Outcome MeasuresTemporary and persistent patterns of NSLP participation, and age-specific and sex-specific BMI raw scores calculated at 5 data points.ResultsAmong the low-income children who attended schools that participated in the NSLP, both the children who persistently participated in the program and those who temporarily participated in the program displayed similar socioeconomically disadvantaged factors. Nonlinear mixed models indicated a larger rate of change in BMI (ie, an increase) among low-income, participating girls than among low-income, nonparticipating girls; however, mean BMIs did not significantly differ between low-income girls who participated and those who did not participate. No significant differences were observed among low-income boys.ConclusionsResults suggest that participation in the NSLP is associated with rapid weight gain for low-income girls but not for low-income boys.

Association of Family Stressful Life-Change Events and Health-Related Quality of Life in Fifth-Grade Children

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):354-359. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.13

Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Determine Media Use by Individuals With and Without Major Depressive Disorder

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):360-365. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.27
Special Feature

Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):367. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.23-a

Picture of the Month—Diagnosis

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):368. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.23-b
Advice for Patients

Children and Organized Sports

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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(4):376. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.31
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