[Skip to Content]
Sign In
Individual Sign In
Create an Account
Institutional Sign In
OpenAthens Shibboleth
[Skip to Content Landing]

January 2017 - January 1911

Decade

Year

Issue

June 6, 2011, Vol 165, No. 6, Pages 483-580

Editorial

Adding Fuel to the FireIncreasing Evidence for Developmental Toxicity of Indoor Solid Fuel Combustion

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):565-566. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.6
Commentary

Poliovirus Vaccines: Past, Present, and Future

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):489-490. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.77
On My Mind

Partnering Leadership

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):487-488. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.78

The DASH Diet Predicts Weight GainWhat Does This Mean for My Pediatric Practice?

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):567-568. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.62

Increasing Adolescent Vaccination CoverageThe Challenges That Remain

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):568-570. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.65

Hospital-Based Programs for Children With Special Health Care NeedsImplications for Health Care Reform

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):570-572. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.63
Review Article

Hospital-Based Comprehensive Care Programs for Children With Special Health Care NeedsA Systematic Review

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):554-561. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.74
Research Letters

Spirometry in Biracial Children: How Adequate Are Race-Based Reference Equations?

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):573-574. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.76
About the Cover

Iron lung (c. 1933) used to “breathe” for polio patients until 1955

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):483-483. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.82
This Month in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):486-486. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.81
Article

Indoor Coal Use and Early Childhood Growth

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):492-497. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.294

Cost-effectiveness of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Prophylaxis in Various Indications

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):498-505. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.298
ObjectivesTo evaluate the cost-effectiveness of immunoprophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections with palivizumab based on actual cost and observed incidence rates in various pediatric risk groups.DesignDecision tree analysis comparing children with various combinations of the following indications: chronic lung disease, congenital heart disease, or prematurity (≤32 weeks gestation), and children with none of these indications. One-way sensitivity analyses and Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantify parameter uncertainty.SettingFlorida during the 2004-2005 RSV season.ParticipantsA total of 159 790 Medicaid-eligible children aged 0 to 2 years.InterventionPalivizumab prophylaxis compared with no prophylaxis.Outcomes MeasureIncremental cost (2010 US dollars) per hospitalization for RSV infection avoided.ResultsThe mean cost of palivizumab per dose ranged from $1661 for infants younger than 6 months of age to $2584 for children in their second year of life. Among preterm infants younger than 6 months of age without other indications, immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab cost $302 103 (95% confidence interval, $141 850-$914 798) to prevent 1 RSV-related hospitalization. Given a mean cost of $8910 for 1 RSV-related hospitalization in this subgroup, palivizumab would be cost-neutral at a per-dose cost of $47. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for the other subgroups ranged from $361 727 to more than $1.3 million per RSV-related hospitalization avoided in children up to 2 years of age with chronic lung disease and no additional risk factors. Younger age and multiple indications were associated with improvements in the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio.ConclusionsThe cost of immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab far exceeded the economic benefit of preventing hospitalizations, even in infants at highest risk for RSV infection.

Influenza Coinfection and Outcomes in Children With Complicated Pneumonia

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):506-512. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.295
ObjectiveTo determine the impact of influenza coinfection on outcomes for children with complicated pneumonia.DesignRetrospective cohort study.SettingForty children's hospitals that contribute data to the Pediatric Health Information System.ParticipantsChildren discharged from participating hospitals between January 1, 2004, and June 30, 2009, with complicated pneumonia requiring a pleural drainage procedure.Main ExposureInfluenza coinfection.Main Outcome MeasuresIntensive care unit admission, receipt of mechanical ventilation, receipt of vasoactive infusions, receipt of blood product transfusions, in-hospital death, readmission within 14 days of hospital discharge, hospital length of stay, and cost of hospitalization.ResultsOverall, 3382 of 9680 children with complicated pneumonia underwent pleural fluid drainage; 105 patients (3.1%) undergoing pleural drainage had influenza coinfection. A bacterial pathogen was identified in 1201 cases (35.5%); the most commonly identified bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus in children with influenza coinfection (22.9% of cases) and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children without coinfection (20.0% of cases). In multivariable analysis, influenza coinfection was associated with higher odds of intensive care unit admission and receipt of mechanical ventilation, vasoactive infusions, and blood product transfusions as well as higher costs and a longer hospital stay. Children with influenza coinfection were less likely to require readmission, although there was a trend toward higher odds of mortality for patients with coinfection. In a subanalysis stratified by bacteria, outcomes remained worse for coinfected children in the subgroups of children with S aureus and with no specified bacteria.ConclusionsInfluenza coinfection occurred in 3.1% of children with complicated pneumonia. Clinical outcomes for children with complicated pneumonia and influenza coinfection were more severe than for children without documented influenza coinfection.

Effects of a Peer-Led Asthma Self-management Program for Adolescents

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):513-519. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.79

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Parental Asthma Coaching to Improve Outcomes Among Urban Minority Children

Abstract Full Text
free access has expired quiz
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):520-526. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.57

Community-Level Determinants of Tobacco Use Disparities in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual YouthResults From a Population-Based Study

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):527-532. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.64

Adolescents' Understanding of Research ConceptsA Focus Group Study

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):533-539. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.87

Use of a DASH Food Group Score to Predict Excess Weight Gain in Adolescent Girls in the National Growth and Health Study

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):540-546. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.71

Effectiveness of a Citywide Patient Immunization Navigator Program on Improving Adolescent Immunizations and Preventive Care Visit Rates

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):547-553. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.73
Special Feature

Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):563-564. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.80-a

Picture of the Month—Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
free access
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):563-564. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.80-b
The Pediatric Forum

Sometimes Zero Risk Is Not an Option

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):573-574. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.75
Book Reviews and Other Media

My Baby Rides the Short Bus: The Unabashedly Human Experience of Raising Kids With Disabilities

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):575-575. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.70
Advice for Patients

Diets to Prevent or Treat Obesity

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):580-580. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.96

Adding Fuel to the FireIncreasing Evidence for Developmental Toxicity of Indoor Solid Fuel Combustion

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(6):565-566. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.6
×