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May 1, 2012, Vol 166, No. 5, Pages 399-492 | Nutrition & Health of Children and Adolescents

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

This Month in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):401-402. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.529
Editorial

Nutrient Supplementation and NeurodevelopmentTiming Is the Key

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):481-482. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.199

Why Feed Breast Milk From a Bottle?

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):483-484. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.275

Public Policy to Improve Child Nutrition and HealthChallenges and Opportunities

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):485-487. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.196
Invited Commentary
Review Article

Novel Lipid-Based Approaches to Pediatric Intestinal Failure–Associated Liver Disease

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):473-478. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1896

Diamond et al review the use of lipid minimization and alternate intravenous lipid emulsions in the treatment of intestinal failure–associated liver disease.

About the Cover

Talia's shell, July 2008, in Bay Head, New Jersey

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):399-399. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.317
Article

Preschool Micronutrient Supplementation Effects on Intellectual and Motor Function in School-aged Nepalese Children

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):404-410. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.37

Murray-Kolb et al examine intellectual and motor functioning of children from Nepal who received micronutrient supplementation from 12 to 35 months of age.

Influence of Prenatal and Postnatal Growth on Intellectual Functioning in School-aged Children

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):411-416. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1413

In a follow-up, cross-sectional study, Pongcharoen and coauthors assess the relative influence of size at birth, infant growth, and late postnatal growth on intellectual functioning at 9 years of age. In the related editorial, Cusick and Georgieff suggest that it is never too early to consider the effects of nutrients on brain development.

Maternal Perceptions of Toddler Body SizeAccuracy and Satisfaction Differ by Toddler Weight Status

Abstract Full Text
free access has expired quiz
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):417-422. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1900

In a cross-sectional study, Hager et al examine accuracy of maternal perceptions of toddler body size; factors associated with accuracy of toddler body size; and how maternal satisfaction relates to accuracy/toddler body size.

Persistence of Underweight Status Among Late Preterm Infants

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):424-430. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1496

To determine the association of gestational age with underweight status in infancy, Goyal and colleagues followed up a large cohort of infants from 31 primary care sites within a hospital-owned network who were born at 34 to 42 weeks’ gestation.

Risk of Bottle-feeding for Rapid Weight Gain During the First Year of Life

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):431-436. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1665

In a longitudinal study of infants followed from birth to age 1 year, Li and colleagues conducted multilevel analyses to estimate infant weight gain by type of milk and feeding mode. The study involved 1899 infants with at least 3 weight measurements reported during the first year.

Selective Protection Against Extremes in Childhood Body Size, Abdominal Fat Deposition, and Fat Patterning in Breastfed Children

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):437-443. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1488

Crume and coauthors study data from a large cohort of children to examine the effect of breastfeeding duration on childhood measures of childhood body size, abdominal fat deposition, and fat patterning.

WIC Participation and Attenuation of Stress-Related Child Health Risks of Household Food Insecurity and Caregiver Depressive Symptoms

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):444-451. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.1

Black et al find that the health of children benefits from the prevention of household food insecurity and caregiver depressive symptoms as well as the availability of WIC.

Differences in Nutrient Intake Associated With State Laws Regarding Fat, Sugar, and Caloric Content of Competitive Foods

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):452-458. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1839

Taber et al determine whether nutrient intake is healthier among high school students in California, which regulates the nutrition content of competitive foods sold in high schools, than among students in states with no such standards. Dennison provides a commentary in an editorial.

Potential Nutritional and Economic Effects of Replacing Juice With Fruit in the Diets of Children in the United States

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):459-464. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1599

Monsivais and Rehm estimate the nutritional and economic effects of substituting whole fruit for juice in the diets of children in the United States. Secondary analyses using the 2001-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and a national food prices database were performed.

Associations of Television Viewing With Eating Behaviors in the 2009 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):465-472. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1407

Lipsky and Iannotti examine the associations of television viewing and of snacking while watching television with intake of fruit, vegetables, sweets, and soda; eating at a fast food restaurant; and breakfast skipping in a representative sample of US adolescents.

Special Feature

Picture of the Month—Quiz Case

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):479-479. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1247a

Picture of the Month—Diagnosis

Abstract Full Text
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Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):480-480. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1247b
Advice for Patients

Healthy Eating and Body Size for Toddlers

Abstract Full Text
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(5):492-492. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.271
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