December 2013

Partnership Between Tobacco Control Programs and Offices of Mental Health Needed to Reduce Smoking Rates in the United States

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Rutgers University–Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey
  • 2Kansas Health Foundation, Wichita
  • 3New York State Office of Mental Health, Albany

Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.

JAMA Psychiatry. 2013;70(12):1261-1262. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.2182

In the United States, smoking rates among individuals with a mental illness are at least double those in the general population,1 representing about one-third of the adult smokers. Persons with a current mental illness purchase and consume more than one-third of all tobacco sold.1 If current trends continue, smokers with mental illness will become the majority of US tobacco users, yet many tobacco control efforts do not identify individuals with mental illness as a high-priority population.2

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