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Comment & Response
February 2014

Does Self-medication Predict the Persistence or Rather the Recurrence of Alcohol Dependence?—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 3Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • 5Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • 6Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71(2):205-206. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.3521

In Reply Boschloo and colleagues suggested an interesting point regarding our analyses of the association between self-medication and persistence of alcohol dependence using data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).1 As Boschloo and colleagues noted, in our definition of persistent alcohol dependence, we included individuals with lifetime dependence with or without 12-month dependence at baseline and assessed the association between drinking self-medication among this group with alcohol dependence at follow-up. The association of self-medication drinking with alcohol dependence at wave 2 (follow-up) may vary depending on whether the participant had 12-month (current) alcohol dependence at baseline.

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