[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 50.16.52.237. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
News and Views
July 1998

The Relationship of Depression to Cardiovascular DiseaseEpidemiology, Biology, and Treatment

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga (Drs Musselman and Nemeroff); and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (Dr Evans).

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1998;55(7):580-592. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.55.7.580
Abstract

This article reviews the burgeoning literature on the relationship of mood disorders and heart disease. Major depression and depressive symptoms, although commonly encountered in medical populations, are frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). This is of particular importance because several studies have shown depression and its associated symptoms to be a major risk factor for both the development of CVD and death after an index myocardial infarction. This review of the extant literature is derived from MEDLINE searches (1966-1997) using the search terms "major depression," "psychiatry," "cardiovascular disease," and "pathophysiology." Studies investigating pathophysiological alterations related to CVD in depressed patients are reviewed. The few studies on treatment of depression in patients with CVD are also described. Treatment of depression in patients with CVD improves their dysphoria and other signs and symptoms of depression, improves quality of life, and perhaps even increases longevity. Recommendations for future research are proposed.

×