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June 2015

Are Anti-inflammatory Therapies Viable Treatments for Psychiatric Disorders?Where the Rubber Meets the Road

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
  • 2University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson
JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(6):527-528. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.22

Accumulating data indicate that inflammation may play a role in a host of psychiatric illnesses.1 These data reveal reliable associations of inflammatory markers with psychiatric disorders, the induction of psychiatric symptoms following administration of inflammatory stimuli, the association of inflammation-related genes with psychiatric disease, and the elucidation of neurobiological and immunological mechanisms by which inflammation targets neurotransmitters and neurocircuits to change behavior. Nevertheless, whether therapeutic strategies that inhibit inflammation will be effective in treating psychiatric illnesses remains unclear. This question is not trivial given the pressing need for novel therapeutics based on the high rates of treatment resistance across disorders and on our relatively limited psychopharmacologic repertoire.

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