[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.157.19.94. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Views 334
Citations 0
Comment & Response
August 2016

Childhood Trauma as a Neglected Factor in Psychotic Experiences and Cognitive Functioning—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, England
  • 2Society and Mental Health Research Group, Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health, King’s College London, London, England
  • 3Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, England
  • 4Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 5Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 6Friedman Brain Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016;73(8):876-877. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.1170

In Reply We agree with Begemann and colleagues on the importance of considering relevant environmental factors in studies investigating the association between psychotic experiences and cognition. An association between childhood trauma and risk for later psychosis has been documented.1 Indeed, we found strong evidence in the South East London Community Health (SELCoH) Study for higher rates of psychotic experiences in those who were physically or sexually abused during childhood.2 While it remains unclear whether the association between childhood trauma and risk for psychosis is a causal one, plausible psychological and biological mechanisms have been proposed1 and future work, particularly using longitudinal designs, may shed further light on this important question.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×