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Editorial
October 2016

Toward Precision Epidemiology

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, Maryland
  • 2Office of the Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, Maryland
  • 3Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, Maryland
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016;73(10):1008-1009. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.1869

Despite our increased understanding of their neurobiology and social determinants, the treatment of psychiatric disorders continues to be a major public health problem. A better understanding of their natural history could advance our comprehension of their etiology and inform efforts to develop more effective treatment and preventive interventions. The study of Paksarian et al1 in this issue of JAMA Psychiatry represents an important step in this direction.

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