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Comment & Response
November 2016

Changes to the Definition of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the DSM-5

Author Affiliations
  • 1Wright-Patterson Medical Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio
  • 2Department of Psychiatry, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio
JAMA Psychiatry. 2016;73(11):1201-1202. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.1671

To the Editor Are DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criteria better than in DSM-IV? Friedman et al1 maintain that changes were evidence-based and most critiques are based on misconceptions; Hoge et al2 argue changes risk negative clinical/forensic/research implications. More than likely, both groups—many of the greatest contributors to current trauma-related knowledge—are right.

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