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Invited Commentary
November 02, 2016

Challenges and Opportunities in Studies of Cognition in the Prodrome to PsychosisNo Detail Is Too Small

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 2Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 3Frieman Brain Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 4Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, England
JAMA Psychiatry. Published online November 2, 2016. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.2655

The article in this issue of JAMA Psychiatry by Seidman et al1 presents an important series of findings related to cognitive impairment associated with psychosis. As part of the second phase of the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study,2 this study systematically investigates neuropsychological functioning in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis. The results provide a new reference point for clinicians and researchers by elucidating the profile of neurocognitive deficits associated with the prodrome as well as their potential as risk markers for conversion to clinical psychosis.1 The study also raises several questions that the field will need to address.

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