June 1960

Mental Health Book Review Index

AMA Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1960;2(6):701-706. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1960.03590120109012

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Sponsored by

World Federation for Mental Health International Council of Psychologists American Foundation for Mental Hygiene Research Center for Mental Health, New York University

Editorial Committee

Ilse Bry Chairman Margaret M. Kinney Co-Chairman

The Behavioral Sciences and Mental Health in Relation to the Organization of Knowledge, the Organization of Science, and Bibliography  1. The concept behavioral sciences emerged in the late ’Forties, a time of rising interest in the scientific study of man. Scholars in many fields of specialization felt the need to unify knowledge contributed to the understanding of human behavior from nearly all parts of the scientific world. The group of scientists who coined the term and later launched the journal Behavioral Science, chose the word “behavioral” from the psychologist’s vocabulary because it was applicable to biological and social studies and acceptable to scientists in these fields as well.In the past ten years the “behavioral sciences” have,

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