September 1965


Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1965;13(3):289-290. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1965.01730030095020

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Professor Seeley, in his critique, reflects a concern for the welfare of human beings. I share this concern but I think we differ on how this welfare can best be achieved. Seeley seems to imply, although I am not certain that he intended this, that intentions, if they are good, honorable, and just will have desirable consequences. It is just to this point that my critical considerations of this new developing specialty, community psychiatry, were directed. That is, Seeley seems to be saying that the men who are engaged in the development of this new psychiatric specialty are honorable, their intentions are of the best, they want to help people, and they want a better society. Certainly no one can disagree with such goals. But it does not follow that the methods, actions, proposals, and programs that are being considered will achieve these laudable ends.

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