March 1966

Modes of Thinking in Young Children: A Study of the Creativity-Intelligence Distinction.

Author Affiliations

By Michael A. Wallach and Nathan Kogan. Price, not given. Pp 357, with 81 tables and 5 illustrations. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc., 383 Madison Ave, New York 10017, 1965.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1966;14(3):329-331. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1966.01730090105021

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This lengthy and meticulously detailed investigation of creativity focusses on a search for a general pervasive creative function that would be comparable to the "G" concept in general intelligence. That is, can it be demonstrated that creativity and the intelligence are two separate cognitive domains, each having its own internal consistency and each being independent of the other? These authors believe that the work already done in this field does not demonstrate this even though some investigators claim to have discovered a separate creativity function (eg, Getzels and Jackson). Wallach and Kogan have reevaluated work previously done and claim that the findings do show a substantial correlation between creativity and intelligence. Wallach and Kogan attribute this lack of independence between creativity and intelligence in previous studies to the fact that they included too wide a range of functions in the creativity tasks and that they

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