[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.167.142.229. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1968

The Drug Scene in Great Britain—"Journey Into Loneliness".

Author Affiliations
 

By Max M. Glatt, MD; David J. Pittman, PhD; Duff G. Gillespie, MA; and Donald R. Hills. Price, not given. Pp 117, with 2 illustrations. Edward Arnold Publishers, Ltd., London, 1967.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1968;19(2):255-256. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1968.01740080127030

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

This concise volume represents an Anglo American effort to clarify the current situation in Great Britain in regard to a group of "problem drugs." These include (1) cannabis; (2) amphetamines; (3) barbiturates; (4) opiates, synthetic opiates, and cocaine; and (5) hallucinogens. Dr. Glatt is a member of the WHO Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Dependence; Mr. Hills is a Research Assistant on an Alcoholism Addiction Unit at St. Bernard's Hospital, Southall; and the other two authors are Social Scientists from Washington University in St. Louis, Mo.

A brief historical perspective of the drugs and their use in Great Britain sheds light on the controversy that has occurred in this country over the advantages and disadvantages of medical management of addiction. The proponents of changes in our laws have pointed to the "British System" to demonstrate the superiority of medical control over the dispensing of narcotics to addicts. Many American authorities,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×