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Article
February 1976

Memory Functions in DepressionImprovement With Antidepressant Medication

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn (Dr Sternberg), the departments of psychiatry and pharmacology, University of California at Los Angeles, and the Veterans Administration Hospital Brentwood, Los Angeles (Dr Jarvik). Dr Sternberg is now Staff Psychiatrist, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1976;33(2):219-224. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1976.01770020055009
Abstract

•In an attempt to elucidate the memory deficit in depression, short-term memory and long-term memory were examined by means of a memory test battery in 26 hospitalized depressed patients. Their performance was compared with a matched control group and with the performance of those 20 patients who improved after 26 days of treatment with antidepressants. Results Indicate that depressed patients show marked impairment in short-term memory without an impairment in long-term memory. The greater the improvement of the clinical state, the greater the Improvement In short-term memory, whereas long-term memory was not influenced by the therapeutic success.

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