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Article
August 1979

Kazanetz, Schizophrenia, and Soviet Psychiatry

Author Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry Yale University School of Medicine New Haven, CT 06519

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1979;36(9):1029-1030. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1979.01780090115012
Abstract

To the Editor.—  I have been asked by the Chief Editor to comment on "Differentiating Exogenous Psychiatric Illness from Schizophrenia," by Etely Kazanetz, a Soviet psychiatrist (Archives 36:740-745, 1979), and to highlight the context from which the article emerges. The focus and plea of the article, which discusses the confounding of acute and chronic schizophrenia and the dangers of applying the latter diagnosis to the former, are well known in the West and are, in any case, not news. What is news, though, is that there is dissent in Soviet psychiatry; it is this message that emerges most importantly from the report, and it is this message that endows it with historic importance and renders it worthy of our closest attention.Etely Kazanetz is identified as being a research psychiatrist at the Serbsky Institute of Forensic Psychiatry in Moscow. He apparently has published a number of papers on psychiatric diagnosis

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