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Article
January 1982

Are There Borderlines in Britain?A Cross-validation of US Findings

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (Drs Kroll and Sines); and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge Clinical School, Cambridge, England (Dr Roth). Ms Carey is in private practice in St Paul.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1982;39(1):60-63. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1982.04290010038007
Abstract

• This study extends the series of investigations of the borderline concept to a British inpatient population. It compares patients' ratings and diagnoses according to DSM-III, the International Classification of Diseases, ninth version (ICD-9), Gunderson's Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB), and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory data. A subpopulation of British inpatients was identified by DIB and DSM-III borderline criteria. All were given ICD-9 personality disorder diagnoses by their British consulting psychiatrists. The data support the concept of borderline personality disorder in the sense that there is a significant level of agreement between the DIB and DSM-III diagnoses, but the clinical and psychometric differentiation of borderline from other types of personality disorders, as well as the interrelationship between the borderline personality disorder and a concomitant depressive state, remain to be demonstrated before the validity of the borderline concept is established.

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