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Article
October 1982

Neuroendocrine Responses in Diagnostic Groups-Reply

Author Affiliations

Fair Oaks Hospital 19 Prospect Street Summit, NJ 07901
psychiatric Diagnostic Laboratories of America Summit, NJ 07901
Clinical Psychobiology Branch National Institute of Mental Health Bethesda, MD 20205

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1982;39(10):1220. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1982.04290100075019

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Abstract

In Reply.  —Drs Green and Kane correctly pointed out that differences in sleep patterns are possible sources of variance in TSH response to protirelin. They hypothesized that the blunted TSH response to protirelin in manic patients compared with normal controls and patients with schizophrenic psychosis that we reported may be an artifact of differences in sleep onset. This hypothesis is based on two assumptions.First, they assumed that increased TSH release after delay of sleep onset that has been reported in one study can result in a blunted TSH response to protirelin. Second, they assumed that the delay in sleep onset is significantly greater in mania than in schizophrenic psychosis. The first assumption could be tested

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