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Article
December 1983

The Borderline SyndromeII. Is It a Variant of Schizophrenia or Affective Disorder?

Author Affiliations

From the Chestnut Lodge Research Institute, Rockville, Md.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1983;40(12):1319-1323. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1983.01790110061011
Abstract

• Recent studies question whether the borderline syndrome represents two entities: borderline schizophrenia (or schizotypal personality) as a variant of schizophrenia and borderline personality disorder as a variant of primary affective disorder. Relevant data are presented from the long-term follow-up of patients at the Chestnut Lodge, Rockville, Md, receiving systematic diagnoses by the retrospective application of diagnostic criteria. Studied were (1) diagnostic overlap at index admission, (2) diagnostic change over follow-up period, and (3) comparative long-term functional outcome between borderline samples and other diagnostic groups. Findings supported the hypothesis that schizotypal personality (as defined by DSM-III) is a variant of schizophrenia but borderline personality disorder (as defined by the DSM-III and Gunderson et al criteria) is not. An affiliation of borderline personality disorder with primary affective disorder is suggested although not conclusive.

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