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Article
January 1984

Psychiatric Disorders in the Relatives of Probands With Affective DisordersThe Yale University—National Institute of Mental Health Collaborative Study

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Psychiatry (Drs Weissman, Kidd, and Prusoff), Human Genetics (Drs Kidd and Pauls), and Epidemiology (Drs Weissman and Thompson) and the Child Study Center (Dr Leckman), Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn; the Biological Psychiatry Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Md (Dr Gershon, Mr Hamovit, and Ms Guroff); and the Office of Extramural Project Review, Social Work Education Review Committee, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Rockville, Md (Dr Dibble).

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1984;41(1):13-21. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1984.01790120015003
Abstract

• A family study of psychiatric disorders in 2,003 first-degree relatives of 335 probands found increased rates of bipolar I disorder and major depression (MD) in the relatives of probands with bipolar disorder and increased rates of MD in the relatives of probands with MD. There was a similarity in rates of affective disorders in the relatives of ambulatory and of hospitalized depressed probands (suggesting that ambulatory depressed patients may be as suitable as hospitalized ones for biological studies) and a comparability of rates of illness in relatives between centers for most disorders when comparable diagnostic criteria and procedures were used.

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