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Article
October 1984

Lifetime Prevalence of Specific Psychiatric Disorders in Three Sites

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis (Drs Robins and Yale University, New Haven, Conn (Dr Weissman); the Western Psychiatric Institute, Pittsburgh (Dr Orvaschel); Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (Dr Gruenberg); and the Division of Biometry and Epidemiology, National Institute of Mental Health, Rockville, Md (Drs Burke and Regier).

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1984;41(10):949-958. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1984.01790210031005
Abstract

• Lifetime rates are presented for 15 DSM-III psychiatric diagnoses evaluated in three large household samples on the basis of lay interviewers' use of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The most common diagnoses were alcohol abuse and dependence, phobia, major depressive episode, and drug abuse and dependence. Disorders that most clearly predominated in men were antisocial personality and alcohol abuse and dependence. Disorders that most clearly predominated in women were depressive episodes and phobias. The age group with highest rates for most disorders was found to be young adults (aged 25 to 44 years). Correlates with race, education, and urbanization are presented.

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