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Article
February 1985

The Efficacy of Psychotherapeutic Outcome Studies

Author Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio San Antonio, TX 78284
University of Chicago 5841 S Maryland Ave Chicago, IL 60637

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1985;42(2):204-205. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1985.01790250098015
Abstract

To the Editor.—  In his commentary on psychotherapy,1 Dr Glass was rather sanguine about the demonstrated efficacy of psychotherapy outcome studies. He stated that "the question of whether psychotherapy really 'works' has been answered in the affirmative by an impressive number of controlled clinical trials." I believe that such a statement might best be tempered considering the conclusion of a recent relevant article not mentioned by Dr Glass. Prioleau et al2 reviewed the outcome of 32 studies that compared psychotherapy with placebo treatment.Their conclusion was "that for real patients there is no evidence that the benefits of psychotherapy are greater than those of placebo treatment." However, the article by Prioleau et al2 was itself followed by both positive and negative commentaries, as would be expected from such a polarizing report. Nonetheless, it seems that placebo psychotherapy needs to be added to the list of "effective" psychotherapies.

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