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Article
January 1986

Diagnosis of SchizophreniaPrediction of Short-term Outcome

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Research Assessment and Training, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York City (Drs Endicott and Nee and Mr Simon); the Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons (Drs Endicott and Nee and Mr Simon), and the Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health (Dr Fleiss), Columbia University, New York City; and the Department of Quantitative Psychology, New York University, New York City (Dr Cohen).

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1986;43(1):13-19. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1986.01800010015002
Abstract

• Seven systems for the diagnosis of schizophrenia were compared in their ability to predict short-term outcome at follow-up: (1) with each other, (2) with selected specific symptoms, and (3) with a simple additive composite symptom score. None of the systems nor the symptoms predicted strongly, but DSM-III and Schneiderian First Rank Symptoms and the composite score performed somewhat better than the other predictors.

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