April 1986

Tardive Dyskinesia in Young Mentally Retarded Individuals

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Psychiatry (Drs Gualtieri, Schroeder, and Hicks) and Biostatistics (Dr Quade), and the Biological Sciences Research Center (Drs Gualtieri, Schroeder, and Hicks), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr Hicks is now with the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1986;43(4):335-340. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1986.01800040045007

• The results of a systematic neuroleptic withdrawal study in 38 mentally retarded children, adolescents, and young adults are described. The focus of the study was the occurrence of side effects of chronic neuroleptic treatment: tardive dyskinesia, transient withdrawal dyskinesia, nondyskinetic withdrawal symptoms, and a possible behavioral analogue of withdrawal dyskinesia. Transient side effects were noted in 34% of the subjects, and tardive dyskinesia in an equal proportion. The data suggest that cumulative neuroleptic dose may play a role as a risk factor in the development of severe tardive dyskinesia.