[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.158.119.60. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1990

How Old Is the Lesion Presenting as Schizophrenia? Relevance to the Laterality Question

Author Affiliations

Neuropsychiatric Research Laboratory Psychiatry Service Veterans Administration Medical Center 116A1/NLR North Little Rock, AR 72114 Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences 4301 W Markham Little Rock, AR 72205-7199

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1990;47(4):393. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1990.01810160093013
Abstract

By error, the following complete exchange was omitted in the March 1990 issue.—  DXF.

To the Editor.—  The elegant and important data reported by Posner et al1 confirmed our finding2 that some never-medicated schizophrenic patients and some schizophrenic patients free of medication for 6 months or more manifest subtle right hemineglect (inattention to the right hemispace).Regarding the pathogenesis of this lateralized neurological sign, while transient right hemineglect is a hallmark of acute left inferior-parietal injury,3 there is now substantial evidence that environmental factors contributing to schizophrenia may frequently be old, even perinatal.4We recently examined the possibility that in some cases the right hemineglect in chronically psychotic patients may be a manifestation of old inferior-parietal injury. We examined patients with old cortical strokes and found that those who had recovered from old right anterolateral cortical strokes gradually developed a right hemineglect similar to that

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×