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Article
March 1991

Schizophrenia, Neurodevelopment, and DiseaseThe Fifth Biannual Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia, Badgastein, Austria, January 28 to February 3, 1990

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin, Ireland (Dr Waddington), and the National Institute of Mental Health Neurosciences Center, St Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, DC (Dr Torrey).

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1991;48(3):271-273. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1991.01810270083012
Abstract

In the summer of 1921, Sigmund Freud returned to Badgastein, Austria. While resting at what had become one of his favorite Alpine spas, he wrote the first of his posthumously published essays on the occult—"Psychoanalysis and Telepathy" —and the famous letter in which he said, "If I had my life to live over again I should devote myself to psychical research rather than to psychoanalysis."1,2 Thus, there was some historical significance to the selection of Badgastein as the venue for the Fifth Biannual Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia, which took place January 28 to February 3, 1990.

As the meeting made clear, psychiatry has changed much since Freud last visited the mineral baths. Almost 200 investigators from Europe, North America, Israel, Singapore, Japan, and Australia, with backgrounds in a multitude of disciplines, gathered to consider 65 brief papers and 120 posters on numerous aspects of schizophrenia. These presentations were all made

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