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Article
May 1991

Reduction of Temporal Lobe Volume in Bipolar Disorder: A Preliminary Report of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Author Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and the Biobehavioral Sciences UCLA Neuropsychiatric Hospital 740 Westwood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90266
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology UCLA School of Medicine Center for Health Sciences Los Angeles, CA 90024
Biological Psychiatry Branch National Institute of Mental Health Bethesda, MD 20892
Department of Neurology UCLA School of Medicine Center for Health Sciences Los Angeles, CA 90024
Department of Psychiatry and the Biobehavioral Sciences UCLA Neuropsychiatric Hospital 740 Westwood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90266
Biological Psychiatry Branch National Institute of Mental Health Bethesda, MD 20892
Department of Neurology Wadsworth VA Hospital Wilshire and Sawtelle Blvds Los Angeles, CA 90025
Biological Psychiatry Branch National Institute of Mental Health Bethesda, MD 20892

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1991;48(5):482-483. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1991.01810290094018
Abstract

To the Editor.—  We recently reported1 that ratios of temporal lobe area to cerebrum area determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were significantly smaller in patients with primary affective disorder than in normal controls. While the results suggested temporal lobe abnormalities in the patients with affective disorder, only one coronal slice through each middle temporal lobe was examined. We report preliminary findings of total temporal lobe volume in 10 patients with bipolar disorder and in 10 normal controls.

Subjects and Methods.—  Ten patients meeting Research Diagnostic Criteria for bipolar disorder were studied. All patients had bipolar I disorder; six patients were from a previous study.1 The remaining four patients had been admitted for inpatient or outpatient services at the Biological Psychiatry Branch of the National Institute of Mental Health since the previous report. The total group included five men and five women, aged 30 to 58 years (mean,

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