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Article
October 1992

Differential Relapse Following Cognitive Therapy and Pharmacotherapy for Depression

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (Drs Evans, Hollon, DeRubeis, and Grove), and Department of Psychiatry, St Paul (Minn)—Ramsey Medical Center (Drs Piasecki, Garvey, and Tuason). Dr Hollon is now with the Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn; Dr DeRubeis, with the Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Dr Piasecki, with the Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver; Dr Garvey, with the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City; and Dr Tuason, with the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1992;49(10):802-808. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1992.01820100046009
Abstract

• Patients successfully treated during a 3-month period with either imipramine hydrochloride pharmacotherapy, cognitive therapy, or combined cognitive-pharmacotherapy were monitored during a 2-year posttreatment follow-up period. Half of the patients treated with pharmacotherapy alone continued to receive study medications for the first year of the follow-up. All other patients discontinued treatment at the end of the acute treatment phase. Patients treated with cognitive therapy (either alone or in combination with medication) evidenced less than half the rate of relapse shown by patients in the medication—on continuation condition, and their rate did not differ from that of patients provided with continuation medication. It appears that providing cognitive therapy during acute treatment prevents relapse. Whether this preventive effect extends to recurrence remains to be determined.

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