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Article
August 1993

Research Activities of Full-time Faculty in Academic Departments of Psychiatry

Author Affiliations

From the Office of Research, American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC (Drs Pincus and Dial), and the Department of Psychiatry, Loma Linda (Calif) University School of Medicine (Dr Haviland).

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1993;50(8):657-664. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1993.01820200075008
Abstract

Using data collected by a 1989 American Psychiatric Association survey of full-time, salaried faculty in departments of psychiatry at US medical schools, we examined the number of faculty engaged in research, their levels of involvement in research, distribution, sources of funding, fields and topics studied, and training. Using a threelevel measure of research involvement, we categorized 39.1% of the respondents as "researchers," 36% as "limited commitment researchers," and 25.1% as not involved in research. In a pattern similar to that observed for research funding in other studies, half of the researchers were concentrated in the top 15 of the 116 responding departments. Level of research involvement varied by degree type (joint-program MD/PhDs were most involved), sources of funding, fields, and topics. Among faculty with MDs, having had research experiences in medical school or postdoctoral research training was associated with a higher level of research involvement. The findings underscore the need to expand and improve postdoctoral research training—especially for MDs—and programs to recruit college and medical students into psychiatric research.

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