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Article
July 1994

Neural Circuits in Schizophrenia-Reply

Author Affiliations

Maryland Psychiatric Research Center PO Box 21247 Baltimore, MD 21228

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51(7):516. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1994.03950070008004

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Abstract

In reply  McCarley et al note the converging evidence for implicating the STG in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and that STG findings correlate with positive psychotic symptoms. They assert that the STG should be on the list of neural circuits that we presented and on all investigators' lists of items differentiating subgroups of schizophrenia. We agree with the data but not with their conclusions. First, the neural circuits presented in the article were selected to illustrate the advantages of studying schizophrenia from a coherent theoretical framework and not to provide an exhaustive review of brain findings. Second, although the STG, as a single structure, may be very important in schizophrenia, we emphasized composite corticalsubcortical, parallel, segregated neural circuits subserving complex behavioral phenomenon such as psychosis. We do not agree that the STG defines a neural circuit, but we do include it as a cortical component of the anterior cingulate neural circuit already

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