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Comment & Response
December 2015

Notice of Retraction and Replacement. Lopes et al. Gamma ventral capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71(9):1066-1076

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo (USP) School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
  • 3Department of Neurosurgery, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
  • 4Statistics Department of the Mathematics and Statistics Institute of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(12):1258. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.0673

In Reply On behalf of our coauthors, we are grateful to Dr Baethge for his detailed reading of our study. He is correct that for the primary outcome, we inadvertently misclassified a patient (ATa3) as a responder when indeed that patient was a nonresponder. When preparing the table, we inadvertently included in our computation of treatment response a Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) score of 36 (the patient’s first measure) instead of 30 (the second measure). We defined the baseline Y-BOCS score for this study as the last value obtained before surgery. At that point, all patients knew they would receive the procedure.

Thus, instead of 3 of 8 patients responding in the treatment group at 12 months, 2 of 8 responded compared with 0 of 8 in the control group. Because of this error, the analysis has been redone and we have requested that JAMA Psychiatry retract and replace the original article.

In the corrected article,1 corrections have been made to the Abstract; Results, Discussion, and Conclusions sections of the text; Tables 2 and 3; Figure 2; and eFigure 3 and eTables 5, 6, and 7 in the Supplement. The article now concludes, “In this preliminary trial, patients with intractable OCD [obsessive-compulsive disorder] who underwent GVC [gamma ventral capsulotomy] may have benefitted more than those who underwent sham surgery although the difference did not reach statistical significance. Additional research is necessary to determine if GVC is better than deep-brain stimulation.”

We regret the errors caused by this misclassification as well as the confusion it caused for JAMA Psychiatry, readers, and potentially patients.

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Article Information

Corresponding Author: Antonio C. Lopes, MD, PhD, OCD Clinic (PROTOC), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, R. Dr. Ovídio Pires de Campos, 785, 3° andar, sala 9, São Paulo, SP, 01060-970, Brazil (antonioclopesmd@gmail.com).

Published Online: October 28, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.0673

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

References
1.
Lopes  AC, Greenberg  BD, Canteras  MM,  et al.  Gamma ventral capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71(9):1066-1076.
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