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Article
Febrruary 1941

IMPROVEMENT IN BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICEI. SELECTION OF TEST SERUMS; CAUSE AND PREVENTION OF HEMOLYTIC REACTIONS; ROLE OF SUBGROUPS A1 AND A2

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Department of Surgery of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and the Cincinnati General Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1941;42(2):321-337. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1941.01210080121007
Abstract

SELECTION OF NATURAL ANTI-A AND ANTI-B TEST SERUMS OF UNUSUALLY HIGH ISOAGGLUTININ TITER AND IMPORTANCE OF THEIR USE IN GROUPING OF BLOODS PRIOR TO TRANSFUSION  With the discovery of the human blood groups by Landsteiner1 at the turn of this century, the vast majority of dangerous reactions were eliminated, and the transfusion of blood became a relatively safe procedure. Landsteiner observed that the cells of some bloods when placed with the serums of others would clump together. This phenomenon was called agglutination.2 The serum factor in this phenomenon was called the agglutinin, and the cell factor was called the agglutinogen. On the basis of the presence or absence of such serum and cell factors all human bloods can be classified into four groups. Landsteiner was able to divide human blood into three groups.3 The fourth and rarest group was added by von Decastello4 and Sturli in

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