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Invited Critique
July 2012

Putting Our Own House in OrderComment on “Pursuing Professional Accountability”

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliation: Department of Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.

Arch Surg. 2012;147(7):648. doi:10.1001/archsurg.2012.1012

The expert panel convened under the leadership of Dr Sanfey1 provides an extraordinarily well-organized and thoughtful approach to the prevention, identification, and management of problem behavior in surgical residents. The constellation of recommendations the authors generate constitutes best practices for trainees in the dimensions that are listed. A generous body of literature describes characteristics associated with residency applicants who are at higher risk for behavioral problems, and the merit of early identification and intervention is indisputable based on work linking early unprofessionalism with subsequent disciplinary action.2 The information that Sanfey et al synthesized provides an important contribution to the literature on resident training and will serve as a valuable resource to surgeons with designated responsibility for resident training.

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