Invited Commentary
January 2015

Screening Young Adults for Nonhereditary Colorectal Cancer

Author Affiliations
  • 1Medical College of Wisconsin, Surgery, Milwaukee

Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.

JAMA Surg. 2015;150(1):22-23. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2014.1765

The public health burden of colorectal cancer is a significant challenge, with more than 50 000 deaths annually in the United States. Widespread adoption of the US Preventative Task Force Guidelines for mandatory screening for colon cancer, along with improvement in access to advanced fiber optic technology and training of physicians, among other factors, are some of the reasons why the overall incidence of colorectal cancer has been decreasing in the United States and in other developed nations. Randomized trials and epidemiological studies have demonstrated significant decreases in the incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer with the use of colonoscopy (and flexible sigmoidoscopy), with the reduction of risk persistent even at 15 years after a negative colonoscopy finding.1,2

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