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July 2016

Concurrent Surgery and Informed Consent

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Otolaryngology and Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(7):601-602. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2016.0511

Few patients know what it is like to perform surgery, train residents, or be in an operating room (OR). This is understandable; during most operative cases, patients are sedated or anesthetized, and the modern OR is sealed to casual observers for multiple reasons including infection control and privacy. Television often portrays the OR dramatically and rarely depicts the careful but routine manner in which surgical teams conduct patient care. This translates to information asymmetry, where we as surgeons know much and our patients know little about what will happen during their operation.

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