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Research Letter
September 2016

Trends in Inpatient and Outpatient Hysterectomy and Oophorectomy Rates Among Commercially Insured Women in the United States, 2000-2014

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 3Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 4Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
  • 5Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 6Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(9):876-877. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2016.0804

A hysterectomy is the second most common surgical procedure among women in the United States, with approximately 600 000 performed annually for benign gynecologic conditions.1 Trends in hysterectomy rates are an important marker for innovation and quality in gynecology as treatment alternatives increase and as evidence of the underuse of these treatment alternatives emerges.2 The accurate identification of a hysterectomy requires capturing data from both inpatient and outpatient services, given the shifting setting of care over recent years. Yet, the highest-quality national trend estimates have been significantly limited by the exclusion of data on outpatient procedures due to the use of databases restricted to inpatient settings.3,4 Prior studies that included inpatient and outpatient settings have focused on small geographic areas only, limiting their generalizability.5 The lack of national outpatient data is a critical gap because the rapid dissemination of robotic surgery has likely shifted the proportion of hysterectomies that are performed in outpatient settings.

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