[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Views 268
Citations 0
Original Investigation
February 15, 2017

Association Between Smoking Status, Preoperative Exhaled Carbon Monoxide Levels, and Postoperative Surgical Site Infection in Patients Undergoing Elective Surgery

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
  • 2Department of Infectious Disease, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
  • 3Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
JAMA Surg. Published online February 15, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2016.5704
Key Points

Question  Is abstinence from smoking on the day of elective surgery associated with a reduction in the frequency of surgical site infection?

Findings  In this case-control study that included 137 cases of surgical site infection and 255 matched controls among smokers who underwent surgery at an academic referral center, surgical site infection was significantly less likely in those who abstained from smoking on the day of surgery.

Meaning  These findings raise the possibility but do not yet prove that efforts to promote abstinence from smoking on the day of surgery may reduce the risk of surgical site infection.

Abstract

Importance  Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for many perioperative complications, including surgical site infection (SSI). The duration of abstinence from smoking required to reduce this risk is unknown.

Objectives  To evaluate if abstinence from smoking on the day of surgery is associated with a decreased frequency of SSI in patients who smoke cigarettes and to confirm that smoking is significantly independently associated with SSI when adjustment is made for potentially relevant covariates, such as body mass index.

Design, Setting, and Participants  In this observational, nested, matched case-control study, 2 analyses were performed at an academic referral center in the upper Midwest. Cases included all patients undergoing elective surgical procedures at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, between January 1, 2009, and July 31, 2014 (inclusive) who subsequently developed an SSI. Controls for both analyses were matched on age, sex, and type of surgery.

Exposures  Smoking status and preoperative exhaled carbon monoxide level, assessed by nurses in the preoperative holding area. Patients were classified as smoking on the day of surgery if they self-reported smoking or if their preoperative exhaled carbon monoxide level was 10 ppm or higher.

Main Outcomes and Measures  Surgical site infection after a surgical procedure at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, as identified by routine clinical surveillance using National Healthcare Safety Network criteria.

Results  Of the 6919 patients in the first analysis, 3282 (47%) were men and 3637 (53%) were women; median age (interquartile range) for control and SSI cases was 60 (48-70). Of the 392 patients in the second analysis, 182 (46%) were men and 210 (54%) were women; median age (interquartile range) for controls was 53 (45-49) and for SSI cases was 51 (45-60). During the study period, approximately 2% of surgical patients developed SSI annually. In the first analysis (evaluating the influence of current smoking status), there were 2452 SSI cases matched to 4467 controls. The odds ratio for smoking and SSI was 1.51 (95% CI, 1.20-1.90; P < .001), which remained statistically significant after adjusting for covariates. In the second analysis (evaluating the influence of smoking on the day of surgery), there were 137 SSI cases matched to 255 controls. The odds ratio for smoking on the day of surgery and SSI was 1.96 (95% CI, 1.23-3.13; P < .001), which remained statistically significant after adjusting for covariates. Preoperative exhaled carbon monoxide level was not associated with the frequency of SSI, suggesting that the association between smoking on the day of surgery and SSI was not related to preoperative exhaled carbon monoxide levels.

Conclusions and Relevance  Current smoking is associated with the development of SSI, and smoking on the day of surgery is independently associated with the development of SSI. These data cannot distinguish whether abstinence per se reduces risk or whether it is associated with other factors that may be causative.

×