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Invited Commentary
March 15, 2017

Computerized Clinical Decision Support Systems for Prevention of Venous ThromboembolismWhy Can’t My Electronic Health Record Be More Like Netflix, Amazon, Google, and Apple?

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 2Division of Health Sciences Informatics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 3The Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 4Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 5Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
JAMA Surg. Published online March 15, 2017. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2017.0107

For every hospitalized patient, innumerable decisions must be made to ensure the highest quality of care. Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) are a good option to help busy clinicians deliver optimal care. Frequently, we prioritize and make the most imminently critical decisions first and, with competing demands for our attention, may unintentionally overlook other, less pressing, decisions. One important decision that is frequently a lower priority is the prescription of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE). We congratulate Borab and colleagues1 on describing in this issue of JAMA Surgery the effective marriage of technology and clinical practice to improve quality in their systematic review and meta-analysis of CCDSSs to improve prevention of VTE among surgical patients.

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