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Article
January 1921

THE EFFECT OF COMBINED RADIATION AND HEAT ON NEOPLASMS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From Columbia University, George Crocker Special Research Fund, F. C. Wood, Director.

Arch Surg. 1921;2(1):116-129. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1921.01110040125006
Abstract

As a result of animal experimentation and clinical experience, it has become evident that extremely large doses of radiation are necessary to kill neoplastic cells which are located at any considerable distance from the surface of the body. Such dosage is often productive of untoward effects on contiguous and intervening normal tissues, may induce a serious general reaction, and has been known occasionally to cause death. If the lethal action of radiant energy on the tumor cell could be supplemented by that of some other nocive agent which does not increase the general or local damage to the body, it might be possible to extend the field of application of radiation to tumors at present inaccessible.

The fact that, in many instances, spontaneous recession in human tumors was observed to follow a period of fever led us, in 1916, to try the effect of raising the temperature of animals with

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