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Article
September 1921

OBSERVATIONS BASED ON A STUDY OF INJURIES TO THE ELBOW

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Surgery, Tulane University of Louisiana School of Medicine NEW ORLEANS

Arch Surg. 1921;3(2):357-394. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1921.01110080115005
Abstract

At the present time, a lively interest is being manifested in the subject of fractures. This interest is due to several factors, among which may be mentioned the general dissatisfaction which has resulted from the indifferent measures adopted by many surgeons and the indifferent results which have caused economic loss. The desire for improvement is being aided by laws which are demanding an early restoration of function and efficiency. There is a demand for standardization of method and for better results. The Amercian Surgical Association has been instrumental in getting information relative to disability periods, results and similar questions. Prior to their investigation, many surgeons had a sense of self-sufficiency. Following a study of the results in various clinics, individual surgeons are inclined to be more modest, and are therefore showing the interest which they should in newer methods.

Fractures are still being treated by men who have large surgical

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