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Article
March 1922

TECHNIC OF THE TREATMENT OF CARCINOMA OF THE BLADDER AND PROSTATE BY A COMBINATION OF SURGERY, ELECTROCOAGULATION, RADIUM IMPLANTATION AND ROENTGEN RAY

Author Affiliations

Professor of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania; Genito-Urinary Surgeon to the Presbyterian Hospital; Professor of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

Arch Surg. 1922;4(2):451-469. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1922.01110110197008
Abstract

Although one1 of us (G. E. P.), in 1914, recommended, after an experience of two years, the treatment of malignant disease, particularly of the mouth, by the combination of surgery, electrothermic coagulation, roentgen rays and radium, it is true that a similar, though perhaps less efficient procedure, comprising cystotomy, electrocautery removal, application of radium en bloc and roentgen-ray cross-fire was actually employed by the other2 (B. A. T.) in the same year in a patient with carcinoma of the bladder, who today is without symptoms and has never experienced any evidence of recurrence. Since the advent of the practice of using multiple small doses of radium in needle form (emanations or element), an important stride has been taken, better results achieved, and the popularity of radiotherapy greatly extended. This practice, together with the superiority of electrocoagulation over the electrocautery for the removal of the tumor mass, prompted us

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