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Article
May 1922

OPEN PNEUMOTHORAX IN ITS RELATION TO THE EXTIRPATION OF TUMORS OF THE BONY CHEST WALL

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Surgery, Mayo Clinic.

Arch Surg. 1922;4(3):588-597. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1922.01110120105004
Abstract

Perhaps no surgical condition of the chest is more germane to the discussion of pneumothorax than that of tumors of the bony chest wall. Such tumors are usually either malignant or potentially malignant, and often involve an extensive portion of the wall of the thorax. Complete extirpation with a wide margin necessitates an extensive resection, and furthermore, this operation, usually performed in one stage, results in a sudden collapse of the lung. In contrast to conditions following surgery for infectious diseases, there are no inflammatory adhesions of the pleura, and no thickening and fixation of the mediastinum. The posture of the patient, which is usually lateral or dorsal, is favorable to the collapse of the lung and to the transmission of atmospheric pressure to the other side. The operation is concerned with the chest wall, and not with the lung; retraction of a lobe of the lung outside the wound

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