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July 1922

THE PROPER TREATMENT OF CHRONIC MALIGN DISEASES OF THE SUPERFICIAL LYMPH GLANDS

Arch Surg. 1922;5(1):65-109. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1922.01110130074002
Abstract

The term "malign" is here used to define any granulomatous or neoplastic disease against which an individual is unable to muster sufficient spontaneous resistance to induce recovery. Consequently, unchecked malign processes lead to increasing disability and to death, and adequate checking of the disease process is a prerequisite in effective treatment. The degree of malignancy, which determines therapeutic measures, varies with the disease, with the individual, and with the stage of the process, and is, consequently, to be measured in each instance by the preponderance of virulence over individual resistance at the time of observation rather than by pathologic nomenclature.

Chronic malign diseases of lymph glands are of three varieties: (1) granulomas, for example, tuberculosis; (2) neoplasms, especially carcinomas, and (3) a group of maladies intermediate between granulomas and neoplasms, which includes Hodgkin's disease, lymphocytic leukemia, lymphosarcoma, chloroma, and the so-called primary endothelioma and spindle cell sarcoma of lymph glands.

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