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September 1922

DIRECT TRANSFUSION OF BLOODREPORT OF CASES

Author Affiliations

RICHMOND, VA.
From the surgical, medical and urologic services of St. Elizabeth's Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1922;5(2):301-313. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1922.01110140087003
Abstract

The ease with which blood transfusion by the citrate method may be carried out has, during the last ten years, resulted in its use, almost to the exclusion of direct methods. It has popularized transfusion in various diseases, and has, without doubt, in the aggregate been most beneficial. More patients requiring transfusion have been transfused than before the development of the indirect method, and there can be no question that a large number of lives have been saved by its employment. The general statistical results are good. It is in a consideration of the results in individual cases that certain dangers in citrate transfusion become apparent.

REACTIONS FOLLOWING CITRATE TRANSFUSION  Considerable literature has accumulated during the last few months concerning the types of reaction following citrate transfusion, and the causes therefor. P. W. Clough and M. C. Clough1 have given an excellent summary of the three types of reaction:

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