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Article
September 1922

PREOPERATIVE TREATMENT OF MALIGNANT TUMORS OF THE BLADDER BY RADIUM

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Urology, the Mayo Foundation; Section on Urology, Mayo Clinic ROCHESTER, MINN.

Arch Surg. 1922;5(2):334-347. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1922.01110140120005
Abstract

In many instances, the most desirable results in treating malignant tumors of the bladder are obtained by a combination of surgery and the use of the minimal quantity of radium that will effectually limit further activity of the malignant cell. Russ and Chambers,1 in 1913, showed that long periods of radiation killed the cells of transplanted rat tumors, which then were absorbed rapidly. After a shorter radiation, even though the grafted tumor failed to develop, the cells remained at the site of inoculation for a long time, but their capacity for proliferation was diminished. Wassermann2 exposed extirpated rat cancer to radium rays from mesothorium and inoculated the cancer into susceptible animals, but growths did not result. He asserted that the death was nuclear, not cellular; the proliferating power of the cell was destroyed but the cell was not killed. Price3 found that after mouse tumors had been

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